A Jadrolinija Ferry from Italy to Croatia

The view from our Jadrolinija Ferry as we came into port in Split, Croatia.

The view from our Jadrolinija Ferry as we came into port in Split, Croatia.

One thing I’ve been repeatedly annoyed with during our year abroad is the total lack of helpful information online. We’ve come to be VERY spoiled in Seattle, where everyone seems to have a stellar website created by a brother or cousin or friend who is a web designer. In a lot of countries we’ve visited, businesses just don’t have websites. When they do, visiting them is like time traveling back into the 1990s, the time of Geocities and animated gifs and purple fonts. Again and again, the most helpful information we’ve been able to find comes from blog posts written by other travelers.

Beautiful Split as we arrived at 7 in the morning.

Beautiful Split as we arrived at 7 in the morning.

When it came to taking an overnight ferry from Italy to Croatia, I was predictably disappointed in the information the interwebs had to offer. I spent hours and hours searching the internet to try to figure out what to expect. Did we need to book a cabin or can you sleep in common areas? Is it acceptable to bring food onboard with you? Are sharp items forbidden from baggage? Is there a limited liquids rule? How early do we need to arrive? Where do we go to check in? Can you buy food onboard the ferry during the 11-hour trip?

Ancona, Italy at Night before we left Port.

Ancona, Italy at Night before we left Port.

Taking the Jadrolinija Ferry from Ancona to Split was every bit the adventure we hoped it’d be. There was an all-men’s Croatian choir. There were surly Italian and Croatian truck drivers (first and foremost, it is a car ferry), there was a run-down interior that made me feel like we had teleported to Atlantic City circa 1980. Since we were armed with sleeping pills, booked an actual cabin, and brought a bunch of snacks onboard, it was definitely not the nightmare ferry crossing I had feared. In fact, it was pretty fun and I’d do it again.

Hello, Croatia!

Hello, Croatia!

To try to help other travelers, and to show our blog readers what shenanigans we got into during the ferry crossing, we put together answers to some of the questions we had before taking the Jadrolinija Ferry from Ancona, Italy to Split, Croatia.

Is It Ok to Bring Booze (and Food) with You?

Absolutely! In fact, you’d be the odd person out if you didn’t bring at least a liter of wine with you. We only brought two tiny 200mL bottles of red wine along. We might have been the only sober people onboard, except for a 10-year-old girl and (hopefully) the boat captain. (PRO TIP: Bring your own cups unless you’re cool drinking straight from the bottle. Hey, I don’t judge.) Most of the Italians and Croatians who clearly take the overnight ferry all the time brought coolers FULL of food and booze.

Bring Your Own Wine! Yes!!

Bring Your Own Wine! Yes!!

There is some food available for purchase onboard. You can have a full-on sit down dinner in the fancy onboard restaurant. (Note: all it takes to qualify as “fancy” with me is the use of white tablecloths.) The restaurant prices were very reasonable, especially for a “cruise”. I use the word “cruise” loosely.

The Restaurant on our Marko Polo Ferry

The Restaurant on our Marko Polo Ferry

There’s also a snack bar area where you can buy snacks, beer, wine and non-alcoholic drinks. The one thing you should bring plenty of is WATER. It’s overpriced onboard, and I wouldn’t trust what comes from the tap in the bathrooms with my life.

Is There Entertainment Onboard, Like a Normal Cruise?

Exploring the Boat to entertain ourselves.

Exploring the Boat to entertain ourselves.

The short answer? No, unless you count people watching as entertainment. We traveled in February, the lowest of lows as far as tourist season goes. What looked like it might be a duty free shopping area was a total ghost town. There was a dance floor in the lounge area, but like I said, we had less than a half liter of wine on us. It takes more than that for me to start my own dance party.

The Dance Floor! Conveniently located next to the children's play area, because that makes perfect sense.

The Dance Floor! Conveniently located next to the children’s play area, because that makes perfect sense.

We happened to win the cruise lottery, though, and ended up on the ferry that was transporting one of Croatia’s finest all-men’s a capella choirs! I’m not sure Kevin and I have ever been on a boat together without encountering some sort of musical group. In Germany, we ended up on a Rhine River ferry boat with a full-on Oktoberfest Oom-pah band!

The outdoor "cocktail area" on the back of our Ferry.

The outdoor “cocktail area” on the back of our Ferry.

Back to the Croatians though. Having them on our boat was everything I hoped it would be, and more. They belted out tunes with abandon for over a half hour before the boat disembarked. And when I say they belted it, they really belted it. One of the gals who worked on the ferry boat even stood with us and translated the Croatian lyrics for us! Most of the songs were fisherman’s tunes traditional to Croatia, about things like missing your wife and family while you’re at sea. Some were about lost love or lost friends.

The Croatian Men's Choir!

The Croatian Men’s Choir!

We fell asleep to the rumble of the boat engines and the sound of the choir singing in the lounge after they had their dinner. It was really a special part of the cruise.

Should I Book a Cabin?

Cabins onboard our Jadrolinija Ferry

Cabins onboard our Jadrolinija Ferry

That depends on you. Do you like roughing it? Can you sleep even when there are lights on? Are you traveling with a pillow and blankets? Do you feel comfortable sleeping on a hard, semi-dirty carpeted floor next to a man who smells like prosciutto? If you answered yes to all of those questions, then just book the cheapest passage possible – a “Deck” seat. “Deck” doesn’t mean you’ll be sleeping outside. It just means you have to hunker down and sleep in the boat’s common areas – the lounge, the chapel, the children’s play area, the dance floor. MOST people who seemed like ferry regulars seemed to have just Deck tickets, and they made themselves at home in the lounge.

The Lounge on our Jadrolinija Ferry, the "Marko Polo".

The Lounge on our Jadrolinija Ferry, the “Marko Polo”.

We booked the cheapest cabin, a couchette, and were SO glad we did. We’re traveling pretty light, so we don’t have things like blankets or pillows to make a deck ticket do-able. It was also nice to be able to lock our bags in our room and explore the boat without all our stuff. Also, I think there is a time and a place for the smell of prosciutto. Two in the morning is not the time.

Ferry Veterans, hunkering down for a night in the lounge.

Ferry Veterans, hunkering down for a night in the lounge.

Our simple couchette cabin didn’t have a sink or bathroom, it was just a room with four bunks which we had all to ourselves. We were just down the hallway from a shared bathroom that was a bit rustic, but not a nightmare. Added bonus? If you book a cabin you get free breakfast onboard in the restaurant!

Sunrise Breakfast - Complimentary with Cabin Purchase!

Sunrise Breakfast – Complimentary with Cabin Purchase!

Seat tickets are also available, but literally NO ONE had one of these on our ferry. The seat room is a brightly lit room full of tightly packed seats that recline slightly. I do not recommend this option.

Here’s a peek at our Cabin:

Our Couchette Cabin. Small but Mighty.

Our Couchette Cabin. Small but Mighty.

Cabins on a Jadrolinija Ferry. Moderately comfortable.

Cabins on a Jadrolinija Ferry. Moderately comfortable.

To book tickets, do it ahead of time directly with Jadrolinija.

So What Is the Price Breakdown?

Our Jadrolinija Ferry

Our Jadrolinija Ferry

First, everyone pays a bare Per Person Fee called “passenger taxes” (You pay this no matter what accommodations you book) of 114 HRK (about $16).

Then, on top of the bare per person fee, you have to select your “accommodation”. Here are some options we considered:

  • Deck Ticket: 301 HRK (about $43) per person
  • “Seat” Ticket: 361 HRK (about $52) per seat
  • Cabin 4-berth Couchette: 811 HRK (about $116) for 1 person, 540 HRK ($77) per person for 2, 3 or 4 people
  • Cabin 2-berth outside with shower/toilet: 1484 HRK total ($212) for 2 people or 1114 HRK ($159) for 1 person
  • Berth in a Unisex 4-berth couchette: 540 HRK ($77) per person

The couchette ended up being most cost effective for us. So the total fare for Kevin and I for the Ancona to Split ferry was 2*114 HRK for Passenger Taxes plus 2*540 HRK for our private couchette cabin, which came out to a grand total of 1308 HRK, or about $187. Not bad when you consider it was an 11-hour journey with beds to sleep in and breakfast included. It sure beat the cost of flying!

Can I Bring Liquids or Sharp Objects Onboard?

Our Boat, the Marko Polo.

Our Boat, the Marko Polo.

We saw so many things onboard that made us do a double take. One man had a huge butcher’s knife to prepare his dinner in the lounge. Another group had a full sized rolling cooler with drinks and dinner supplies. Another group brought a couple big chocolate cakes onboard with them. One guy had a handle of vodka.

Within reason, you can bring anything your heart desires onto the Jadrolinija ferry. I prrrrobably could’ve smuggled Kevin onboard in a big suitcase to save money. But we’re not quite THAT cheap… Yet.

Where and How Do I Check In?

Jadrolinija Ferries, where you board by just walking on via the car ramp and roaming around until you find the right stairwell. Very organized.

Jadrolinija Ferries, where you board by just walking on via the car ramp and roaming around until you find the right stairwell. Very organized.

Ugh. The Jadrolinija ferry check-in process is just awful. Imagine the run-around you get when dealing with health insurance in the United States. Now take that experience, and change the context to traveling, and change the language to Italian and Croatian. THAT is the joy that checking into the Jadrolinija ferry will bring you. There’s a reason we opened our wine and started drinking midday before we left on our ferry:

Day drinking outside the Jadrolinija Ferry Check-in Building.

Day drinking outside the Jadrolinija Ferry Check-in Building.

I made a google map showing all the important locations for Jadrolinija ferry check-in:

Here’s what you should know to get through check-in without wanting to strangle someone:

  • Arrive more than 2 hours early! Do not even think about cutting it close. You want to allow lots of extra time to account for unhelpful employees, slow check-in lines, busses that run infrequently, and last-minute trips to the store to get extra wine.
  • If you arrive by train, you’ll arrive to the main Ancona Train station (the red pin on the map). If it’s raining and the timing lines up, you can connect on a train to the Ancona Maritima station (the blue pin on the map), which is much closer to the main Ferry area.
  • The ferry check-in building is nowhere near the ferry departure point. On the map above, Ferry check-in is at the red star, while the green star is the main ferry area where the ferries dock. At the main ferry area (green star), there is luggage storage (EURO 2/bag) and free bathrooms, and this is where you’ll go through passport control before boarding your boat.
  • There is a FREE BUS that runs every 20 minutes or so between the Check-in Building (Red star) and the Main Ferry Building (Green star). We were glad we used the bus, because I would EASILY get lost in the area around the Check-in building and there are no sidewalks.
  • Passport Control opened 2 hours before our boat departure. Unless you have a deck ticket and want to stake out a nice sleeping spot in the lounge, there’s no rush to board. Take your time exploring Ancona, have some dinner at a local cafe, buy some biscotti from one of the town’s many bakeries, then get on the boat when there’s less than an hour before departure. Once you’re onboard, head to the reception desk to pick up the key to your cabin, and hunker down for the night!

We Want to Hear From You!

A Jadrolinija Ferry docked here in Split, Croatia

A Jadrolinija Ferry docked here in Split, Croatia

Do you have any interesting cruise stories? Are you planning to take A Jadrolinija Ferry from Italy to Croatia? Leave us a comment to let us know!

12 thoughts on “A Jadrolinija Ferry from Italy to Croatia

  1. Again Mel, Sooooo entertaining!!!!!! I did take a ferry from England to Ireland (just three hours) and really enjoyed it! Would enjoy your trip, especially with a cabin option!!!!! Thanks for the good advice and info! You really must think a bout publishing all of this when you get home to the U.S.!!!

  2. Thank you for the advices and infos! ;-) now i’ve got a picture in my head! i’ve got the same problem. we will travel in the summer to croatia and the homepage of jadrolinija just sucks ;-) way back in the 90s…

    • YES – totally the 90s, it’s terrible! I’m so glad that this helped you! I’ll cross my fingers that there happens to be a Croatian Men’s Choir on your ferry too. :-)

      • By the way, if you’re staying in Split, we stayed in a cute little Airbnb that was definitely the nicest apartment we’ve rented in Europe so far. If you’re looking for a place to stay in Split, we definitely recommend this one.

        And if you haven’t signed up for Airbnb yet, you can get a $25 (or 23 euro) credit if you sign up with my affiliate link! :-)

  3. Melanie-
    So glad to find your site! My fiancé and I are taking the ferry (deck seats…) tomorrow and did not know what to expect, feeling much more excited about this ferry trip now!

    • I’m so glad you found my post helpful! How was your voyage? I hope it wasn’t too bad – I’d actually be super curious to hear how the Deck Seats were during high season since our voyage was in February.

  4. Thanks for the article! I’ve been looking everywhere for some information on the Ancona / Split ferries and found this very helpful! Thanks again :)

  5. Thanks for writing this up! I’m having the same issues with finding info, and while I’m going from Split to Ancona in May, I do feel more prepared! I ended up booking the outside room since it was about the same price as couchette when I looked at it, and I am a terrible sleeper.

  6. You are a life-saver!! Thank you so much for writing you experience. I’ve done the overnight ferry on the “deck” but it was in Denmark, so it was pretty nice, and with a large group. This is crazy question, but did you happen to see any gluten free options for food on board? I have Celiac… Thank you again!

    • Hey Audra!

      I would not rely on them to have gluten free options onboard for you. Since it was low season, the only thing that was really open was a “snack bar” with a few really processed food options. The best you’d probably be able to do onboard is a hunk of cheese and a bottle of wine. Which kind of sounds like a party, but you might want to purchase and bring aboard something a bit more balanced. :)

      Safe travels!
      -M

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